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20121206
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. to quote admiral mike mullen again, the pentagon budget was doubled in the last decade. and we have lost the ability to prioritize. to make our decisions and to do tough analysis. we also need a review of our defense strategy to make sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the foundation has funded two efforts along these lines to help advance the best ideas of improving our strategies. earlier this year, we funded a project by the stimson center, which brought together 15 defense experts to examine our strategic defense priorities in some detail and how they should be reformed. today, we announced a new coalition for fiscal and national security. the coalition chaired by admiral mike mullen in regards to defense of both republican and democratic administrations, stretching back more than 30 years, as well as leaders to the congress including the very distinguished gentleman here today. all that served our nation, and they are joining together now to say very clearly that our leaders must find solutions for the long-term fiscal cha
as the pentagon. we ought to be thinking of that in terms of our values and our future. let me speak to a couple of elements here that i think progressives should keep in mind. progressives cannot afford to stand on the sidelines in this fiscal cliff debate. important critical decisions will be made soon that will affect this country for 10 years. i think we need to be a part of this conversation. we need to be open to some topics and some issues that are painful and hard for us to talk about. we cannot stand by the sidelines in denial that this is ever going to engage us in the things we value. we cannot be so naive to believe that just taxing the rich will solve our problems. i believe that is an important part of a solution. we have to look to reform and change that is significant, that preserves many of the values and programs that brought us political life, and we cannot believe that merely ignoring these programs or not engaging will solve the problem. pick up any of the newspapers and look for the full-page ads and you will see on a daily basis organizations that we respect and are engage
, a former pentagon official said among our guests. we begin tonight with that triple digit rally on wall street. the market interpreted positive statements on a potential deal on the fiscal cliff by house speaker and rebounded from what had been a 112-point slide after the morning's opening bell. the dow jones industrials reversed, as i said, on the speaker's positive remarks and finished the session up 107 points. s&p up 11, nasdaq gained 24. all ten s&p 500 sectors moved higher on the day. that is the first time it has happened since october 4th. retailers drove the consumer discretionary sector energy industrials lead in the wake, and the rally started just minutes before house speaker made it clear that republicans are willing to deal on revenue and ready to find a resolution now. >> we all know that we have had this spending crisis coming at us like a freight train. it must be dealt with. and in order to try to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table, but it is time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our c
in the government, including in the pentagon. i'm a defense hawk, but the pentagon needs to do a better job when it comes to handling the people's money too. you can't close that gap between spending and the debt by just raising taxes on the two upper income tax breaking news, you havbrackets.you have to deal wig entitlements like medicare and social security. >> greta: what do you think is going to happen? will we go over the fiscal cliff, or a last-minute hustle and something will be packaged together, probably not very satisfactory to anyone, not likely to solve our nation's problems? >> well, i feel like it's more likely than not we will go off the cliff. i'm not convinced that's not the president's plan. patty murray, one of the leading democrats, gave a specie a few weeks ago at brookings ago, said cliff in order to generate the additional taxes they want they would be willing to do so. i think that's incredibly reckless, because a lot of americans will be put out of work, the economy will crater, we'll be in a recession again, and once you start down that road it hard to know where it sto
the pentagon get a blank check while agencies that dispense aid to have to fight for every single nickel that they receive? why do we send and spend without restraint on wars and weapons and destroy life but we squeeze those programs that saved lives? for many years now, and you all heard me, this is my 443rd five-minute speech on this issue, for many years now i've been promoting the idea of smart security. smart security means protecting our interests, not with military force or by maintaining a massive nuclear arsenal, but by investing in development and diplomacy, through humanitarian assistance and partnerships around the world. at the aids conference in washington this past summer, there was a panel discussion on how in the struggle against hiv-aids we can do more with less. and what i want to know is, why do we have to settle for less when it comes to hiv-aids? this is a humanitarian crisis. our sense of moral deansency should be -- should compel us to invest whatever it takes to bring an end to it. it's not just the right thing, mr. speaker, it's the smart thing to do for our nat
for the pentagon and fluctuations in global energy prices can have dramatic, dramatic effects on defense spending. for every $10 increase in a barrel of oil it costs the american military annually an extra $1.3 billion. recognizing the potential instability that d.o.d.'s current energy needs can cause, military experts from across the various branches of the armed services have begun looking at ways to cut energy use and find energy alternative. now, i continued to hear all of this discussion about how this is somehow a green agenda and it's a suber havesive plot and it's being forced on a resistant president. and i just want to take a minute or two, mr. president, and say i don't think anything could be further from the truth and just wanted to describe for a moment why i feel that way. first, those who oppose defense energy initiatives often argue in today's fiscal environment, the country can't afford to waste money on energy programs when it's necessary to provide for our nation's security. i don't believe, mr. president, it is an either/or proposition, because my view is that an investment i
in session. the fight to allow women to fight in combat roles. the pentagon says it cannot comment on the current case and while the says it is working on a solution, some of the women filing the lawsuit says that doesn't change the discrimination they feel they suffered so far. >> my gender has never been a factor in accomplishing my unit's mission. >> i would be assigned positions based on my gender rather than my qualifycation or accomplishments. >> it doesn't make sense for the military. megyn: do they have a case? jonna spilbor ... jonna they can serve in combat-related roles. two of the women have purple hearts for flying helicopters. but there are hundreds of thousands of jobs potentially available to men that are not available to women in the military and they say it's a discrimination issue. >> i think they are right. kudos to them for being so brave. being on the battlefield there is no bigger job for anybody in the military. why not treat this like any other title 7 case. they are women. you can't say because you are a woman you can't do something that a man can do unles
in it programs the pentagon is saying we don't want. >> making subs in connecticut. >> they want subs. but, there is a certain reality that -- look at the fence and what happened this week. it was going to be raised. didn't get raised. in that package were defense budgets the pentagon says they don't want funded. they have to be included in the defense budget. >> i agree. to go back to the tax thing, you have to be careful with two thing that is are overlooked. the american federal system of taxes is progressive, very progressive. >> on the books it is. we should make that distinction. >> it is very progressive and way more progressive than countries like the european countries that have less income and equality. the idea that making it more progressive will address it is actually a real stretch. the other thing is we have to be very careful, you guys. it's not what i want. to be careful about what we wish for. it is a very well known fact of the economists and i agree, that the people who write the check are not necessarily the one who support the burden of the tax. when, you know, you ha
and the unique experience even at the pentagon and security advisor to the president. he made an early point i was familiar with based on my experience with 35 years of congress that we have all these different agencies and departments and people all over the government as well as congress that had parts of the energy package that never had a way to take a look at what should be our policy and came up with this idea the council to recommend here comeau recalled the different departments chaired by the department of energy and secretary in agencies that reach out to all the interested parties to make sure their views take consideration. but it is royal energy review. it's very different from what they do at the pentagon. with this technique but it's helpful and it will be hall posters talk about a strategy in the broader view through the quaternary old report to really get into details. and the congress of course we've got all these different committees as part of the jurisdiction. i had a simple solution. i called the two minute she -- saint pete, we need some, but not. every now and then i wo
to welcome minister barak to the pentagon. i would like to begin by taking a moment to pay tribute. he has made an announcement that he intends to retire from political life in israel. our friendship stretches back a number of decades to i think the beginning -- my time as member of congress and as a member of the clinton administration. we also worked closely when i was director of the cia and had a number of meetings in that capacity and certainly now as secretary defense. since i became secretary of defense, we have been in regular communication and have built a strong working relationship. i could not have more respect for he is brilliant, strategic mind. he has one of the best in the business. it stems from a warrior heart and his warrior experience. he has had a lifelong and to protecting the state of israel -- lifelong commitment to protecting the state of israel. a few people have such far- reaching and positive impacts on israeli security and prosperity. i have to say on that u.s.- isreali relationship, it is the strongest -- the relationship between the united states and israel i
with questions about unprecedented and some inappropriate access to classified information. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr spoke to the filmmakers. >> don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark thirty," the story of the hunt for osama bin laden, from the oscar-winning powerhouse team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our
brought all these cases to the attention of the pentagon. the secretary of the army responded with an assurance that our flag would be flown at army installations whenever the flags of the states are on display. and many of the individual installations i mentioned took corrective action when i contacted them. but despite this response, i continue to receive reports of situations where territorial flags are forgotten. see, the problem is there is no uniform regulation governing the inclusion of the flags of the district of columbia and the territories, though the secretary -- army secretary said it is the policy of the air force, the coast guards, the marines and the navy to let local commanders have the discretion to display state flags. with or without the flags of the territories on their installations. i have requested that the service modify their regulations to include our flags but no action has been taken. and i believe it should not be at the discretion of individual base commanders to decide to exclude any part of the united states. or the fighting men and women from
on television five times when everyone in the white house, the pentagon knew that was just a bill of goods. >> gregg: i read that he said his moral fitness argument distilled down to its essence is this: she knew the video story line was questionable, and yet she was parroting these talking points. if you're a strong moral character, you say, wait a minute. i know there is something wrong with this. >> gregg, here is the issue: why wasn't hillary clinton out there? why weren't the few other people above susan rice there? was this kind of an opportunity for her to show her allegiance to the president so that when hillary left she could be secretary of state? by the way, she had access to all those presidential briefings. >> gregg: the classified information, she had access to? >> absolutely. she dug her heels in and said no, it's a spontaneous video. i want to know who told you that? not just who took out al-qaeda and terrorist that you knew about, but going back to mukasey, he says, wait a minute. she's saying and the president is saying she did an outstanding job at the u.n. really? do y
syria deploy chemical weapons, and america is forced to take action, the pentagon estimates it would take 75,000 troops to seize all the regime's weapons. syria is one of eight countries that have not signed in 1992 convention banning chemical weaponry. other countries refusing to sign our israel and north korea and egypt. a u.n. conference in dubai is underway right now. new questions about internet freedom. two dozen countries, including iran, syria, north korea, could be making decisions affecting communications worldwide. catherine herridge has more in washington. reporter: thank you, megyn, and good afternoon. the international telecommunications union, this conference in dubai is viewing rules established long before the internet became a primary method of communication. the u.n. body could impact every day vacation. >> this could affect every cell phone tablet personal computer in the world. pretty much every chip in every type of consumer devices have an ip address associated with them. therefore, there are proposals that the there be a registry for each of those computer chi
ground operation would be necessary. the pentagon estimates it will take 25,000 troops to seize syria's chemical weapons stockpile. just ahead, general jack keane will join us live to discuss the implications of sending u.s. missiles to the board and why this cache' of chemical weapons requires such a response. >> more on the attack on our consulate in benghazi. james clapper walked house lawmakers through the details of the attack that ended with the death of ambassador chris stevens and three others. clapper trying to answer questions about president obama's handling of intel before, during and after the attack. tom rooney was in that briefing. welcome to the program. it's great to see you. did we learn anything? did the ball get advanced this morning? >> i got this briefing a few weeks ago as a member of the intelligence committee. date was open up for the rest of the house. i learned a lot. i learned we do not have adequate protection at our compound there in libya, benghazi. and if that's the case in other dangerous areas of the world, then we have got a lot of work to do at the
the sequester, that's good, less spending. i'm in favor of looking at the pentagon spending and reforming how you get it and get the same amount of dollars. look at the government spending. >> not a common republican position. >> more common than you think, but it's not common in the appropriations committee that does armed services. i talked to one of the key guys over there and said how can i help you reform the pentagon? there must have been -- >> i bet congressmen love getting that call, grover norquist, how can i help? >> i start meetings that way. want to make the government more efficient, make it cost less and we are everybody's friend on that subject. ralph nader and i were lobbying the bush administration back in 2001. >> what about the second cliff, the bush tax cuts? >> i think -- you get towards the end in a thing and if the republicans have played it right, they said look, push it out a month or two weeks so you should never actually go over these things, just as you do with continuing resolutions. say, look, give it a week, two months. >> the president is not going to extend. h
in the defense of the country out of the pentagon, and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, talk with senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act, and the future of the republican party. the president has written several books and reports, including his latest, "the debt bomb." live sunday at the 12:00 noon eastern. >> no, we hear from a syrian opposition spokesman about the latest developments in the ongoing syrian civil war. the spokesman urged the international community to intervene, and calls for u.s. leadership, rather than just humanitarian aid. from johns hopkins, this is an hour and a half. >> thank you. thank you for everyone. thank you for the john hopkins university for organizing this event. let me start by sharing with you a personal story that just happened today, which gives you just a sense of how our lives became tragic. today, one of my close friends, a well-known activist in my home town, has been killed by indiscriminate shelling in the city. daria is 7 kilometers south of damascus. and it has been days o
savings in the pentagon i think is not a fair assessment. at simpson-bowles said and others, there are savings to be had there that would not compromise our national security. i want to also add simpson-bowles approach establish firewalls in the outer years to delay the temptation to go back into the nondefense accounts when too much political pressure keeps you out of defense spending. so i would hope that in a long-term agreement would include that. on the nondefense side, i still think there's a savings to be found. i give you a couple illustrations of those that i think might be of some value to us. first, hats off to debbie stabenow and pat roberts putting together a far build that safest $23 billion over the next 10 years. that's something that hits my state directly, but i think they did it thoughtful, bipartisan job of saving money toward deficit reduction. there are other areas where savings can be found as well. and i think that we need to look at those honestly. let me kill you, i think the infrastructure is one area where we we should consider as simpson-bowles d
to be there to gather intelligence to make sure is there another attack coming? is it coming on our pentagon? is it coming toward the white house? is it coming to that second tower so we can protect american lives? that's the difference between the law of war and common crimes. that's an important distinction that has been recognized long before, with all respect to my colleague from kentucky, in world war ii in in ray quirin, our united states supreme court in world war ii recognized this authority, the difference between the law of war. in that case, an american citizen who collaborated with the nazis was held under the law of war because our country was at war. i would also like to point out that this would only cover under the current law authorized by this congress, it would not apply to someone who is holding ammunition or someone who is paying with cash. it only applies to a person who has planned, authorized, committed or aided the terrorist attack that occurred on september 11 or harbored those responsible for the attacks, or a person who has a part or has substantially supported al
the money, but we could transfer responsibilities out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several books and reports. join our three-hour conversation with your calls, e-mails, tweets, and facebook comments for medical doctor, author, and senator tom coburn. >> he worked his way up, went to harvard law school, and at the urging of one of his brothers, emigrated out west to illinois. he arrived after about a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived on a steamboat in this muddy mining town, board himself in a log cabin, established a law practice, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer and then got involved politically, ran for congress, served for eight terms, and then defended abraham lincoln, obviously, from illinois, and then ulysses s. grant. as they were on the rise, washburne stated them is very close colleagues. after grant was elected presiden
're getting breaks news on syria. straight to our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, for new details here as we're talking about, you know, potential chemical weaponry. now not only talking about it, not only existing in syria, but the fact you're hearing from a u.s. official it is being nixed. tell me what you know. >> now we know what is going on. over the weekend, the u.s. got intelligence that syrian forces were beginning to start mixing chemical agents. essentially putting two chemicals together that would allow them to make deadly sarin gas. this is extremely serious news regarding the war in syria because until now there has not been that mixing together, the next step would be to put that deadly sarin into artillery shells. the u.s. believes, brooke, that the assad regime is looking at the possibility of some kind of limited chemical artillery strike on its own people, on rebel forces. officials tell us they hasten to add they don't believe assad -- bashar al assad has made the final decision to go ahead with a strike, but that that's what these preparations could be aimed towards
in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is foundation. and we have i think the united states, both an opportunity to require it to get our house in order, and i believe that our 100 senators and members of the house will step up on this and sufficient majority in the coming months. >> how do you look at your surplus of the u.s.? does that say we have america under our control? >> we are one of the closest allies of the united states. so of course our posi
the pentagon bio fuels program. the defense bill has always had bi-partisan support. this time, it passed unanimously 98 to zero. we will be right back. who watch our show to be able to come away armed with facts and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them that you're put on this planet for something more! i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action for themselves. as a human being that's really important. this is not just a spectator sport. [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv this is "the bill press show". >> president obama tells bloomberg news one more time, there will be no deal unless tax rates go up for the wealthiest of americans. what do you say? hello, everybody. and a great big wednesday morning to you. great to see you this morning. it is the full court press coming to you live from our nation's capitol here on washington d.c. keeping our eye on what's goi
of the country out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend you can talk with oklahoma senator about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest the debt bomb. join our conversation live sunday at noon eastern an c-span2. >> vice president biden shop t at the opening of the first costco warehouse in the nation's capitol. he also made remarks about the fiscal cliff and middle class tax cuts. >> i went to get my wife's card and she said no, you get your own. [inaudible conversation] >> i know what i am looking for. [inaudible conversation] >> vice-president, what are you shopping for? >> my wife is starting a thing called book buddies for women's shelters and daycare centers. i am buying a bunch of books for the book buddies back in delaware. >> how are you choosing your books? >> based on some things i know my grand kids like. will i come to that side? i'm going to come around that way. in this store.s in this storfos take 2200 books out of thei
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)